Showing posts with label Essential Amino Acids. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Essential Amino Acids. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Amino Acid Analysis Protein


Biosyn provides amino acids analysis service. Using ion exchange, post-column Ninhydrin detection, we provide precise determination of protein quantities, but also provide detailed information regarding the relative amino acid composition that gives a characteristic protein profile, which is often sufficient for identification of a protein.

An Essential Amino Acid

An essential amino acid or indispensable amino acid is an amino acid that cannot be synthesized de novo by the organism and therefore must be supplied in the diet. Nine amino acids are generally regarded as essential for humans: phenylalanine, valine, threonine, tryptophan, isoleucine, methionine, histidine, leucine, and lysine. Arginine is required by infants and growing kids.

Essential Amino Acids

Amino Acids are the chemical units or "building blocks" of the body that make up proteins. Protein substances make up the muscles, tendons, organs, glands, nails, and hair. Growth, repair and maintenance of all cells are dependent upon them.

Amino Acid

In chemistry, an amino acid is a molecule containing both amine and carboxyl functional groups. In biochemistry, this term refers to alpha-amino acids with the general formula H2NCHRCOOH, where R is an organic substituent. In the alpha amino acids, the amino and carboxylate groups are attached to the same carbon, which is called the α–carbon. The various alpha amino acids differ in which side chain (R group) is attached to their alpha carbon.

Monday, May 23, 2011

Non-Essential Amino Acid


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The Chemistry of Amino Acids

Amino acids play central roles both as building blocks of proteins and as intermediates in metabolism. The 20 amino acids that are found within proteins convey a vast array of chemical versatility. The precise amino acid content, and the sequence of those amino acids, of a specific protein, is determined by the sequence of the bases in the gene that encodes that protein.

Essential Amino Acids

Amino Acids are the chemical units or "building blocks" of the body that make up proteins. Protein substances make up the muscles, tendons, organs, glands, nails, and hair. Growth, repair and maintenance of all cells are dependent upon them.

Amino Acids

In chemistry, an amino acid is a molecule that contains both amine and carboxyl functional groups. In biochemistry, this term refers to alpha-amino acids with the general formula H2NCHRCOOH, where R is an organic substituent. In the alpha amino acids, the amino and carboxylate groups are attached to the same carbon, which is called the α–carbon. The various alpha amino acids differ in which side chain (R group) is attached to their alpha carbon. They can vary in size from just a hydrogen atom in glycine through a methyl group in alanine to a large heterocyclic group in tryptophan.